In a Word: Radical Hope

Author:

Category:

In the summer of 2005, I sat across a table in a restaurant with my friend. We had just heard that Canada, where we both lived, had legalized gay marriage. My friend had marched, petitioned, lobbied for many years, though he insisted he never planned to marry. “We worked so long for this,” he said. “And then …” He shook his head. “It’s like it happened overnight.”

I think of that exchange often when I join those working so hard to address the climate crisis. We march, we petition, we lobby. And then … one day, we hear that Harvard has agreed to divest from fossil fuels. That a species is off the endangered list. That renewables are powering entire countries. And though they might seem like small victories, they point to the possible. They point toward a future that we can’t yet see, can scarcely imagine.

The philosopher Jonathan Lear calls this “radical hope.” Radical hope requires that we summon the ability to imagine solutions, despite what’s happening around us. Radical hope is not to be confused with more passive optimism. As Lear puts it, “Radical hope anticipates a good,” although we may not yet be able to conceive of how that hope will take shape. Radical hope is not the stuff of pithy phrases or bromides, rather it asks us to exhibit courage and flexibility and a creativity to respond to challenges. To see radical hope in action, look no further than Greta Thunberg, the Sunrise Movement, Indigenous water protectors, and so many others who refuse to give in. 

Radical hope is not about ignoring the grief and fear I and, perhaps, you feel as we absorb the magnitude of the climate crisis. But I take courage in the work being done by these activists, young and old — those who, in Lear’s words, “facilitate a creative and appropriate response to the world’s challenges.” Feeling both the fear and the promise is what radical hope is. It reminds us that our world continues to hold surprises. Victories that are small until, suddenly, they are big.

Latest Stories

“Eggshells and Coffee Grinds” Program Simplifies Composting

Ok, maybe you haven't jumped on the composting bandwagon entirely. Maybe you don't have the yard...

What’s So Bad About … Nuclear Energy?

Is it the low-carbon answer to keeping our lights on? We can thank nuclear fusion for the...

Greg Milne Does the Right Thing with His Kia Niro EV

For this issue's Cruising with Currier, I took to the dirt roads of West Tisbury with...

Dear Dot: Should I bother with solar panels?

Dear Dot, I was considering getting solar panels on my roof but with the approval of Vineyard...

Good News for Fall 2021

Colorado Goats Fight Fire As climate change–induced wildfires worsen across the world, some locations in the U.S....

In a Word: Radical Hope

In the summer of 2005, I sat across a table in a restaurant with my friend....

Dear Dot: What to do about all our damn packaging?

Dear Dot, Is there any service on the island for recycling soft plastics? We get a lot...
Leslie Garrett
Leslie Garrett has written for the Washington Post and The Atlantic, among others. She writes frequently on environmental and social justice issues, and is the author of The Virtuous Consumer: Your Essential Shopping Guide for a Better, Kinder, Healthier World (and one our kids will thank us for!). Her Bluedot hack? “My clothesline! Is there anything lovelier than slipping between crisp, line-dried sheets that smell of fresh air and sunshine at day’s end?

Read More

Related Articles

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here